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Former Traffic Court Judge Serving New York and New Jersey

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Speeding Archives

City officials renewing calls for speed cameras after release of NYC traffic fatality data

This past Monday, the New York City Department of Transportation released data on motor vehicle fatalities for 2012 and the numbers were rather disconcerting. In particular, the data revealed that speeding motorists were responsible for 81 fatalities in 2012, a 65 percent increase from 2011, which saw a total of 49 speeding-related fatalities.

Ohio judge turns off speed cameras, calling them a 'scam'

From the biggest cities to the smallest towns, thousands of people across the U.S. receive a nasty surprise while leafing through their daily mail: a speeding ticket. What makes it so particularly frustrating is that many of these speeding tickets are not issued by an actual human being, but rather by a sophisticated camera system designed to detect even the slightest infraction.

Governor's proposal calls for dramatic changes concerning speeding tickets

Every day hundreds of drivers across the state of New York are issued traffic citations for exceeding the speed limit. In the vast majority of cases, the people issued these tickets are not bad drivers, rather they simply had a momentary lapse in judgment or just did not realize how fast they were going.

Traffic tickets issued to man in coma

While traffic camera systems are designed to be efficient and unbiased, they can sometimes prove to be models of imperfection. To illustrate, consider a recent news story out of Ohio, where moving violations were issued to a man in a coma.
According to sources, 35-year-old James B. allegedly committed traffic violations by driving 49 miles-per-hour in a 35-mile-per-hour zone back in July 2012. However, at the time the violations occurred, he was in an area hospital fighting for his life after suffering a massive heart attack and slipping into a coma. Family rushed in from out-of-town to visit him, fearing that he wouldn't survive. During that time, one of his family members used his car, which led to the speeding tickets.

Texas judge finally pays speeding ticket after issuance of three arrest warrants

In a very interesting story, a Texas judge has finally paid an outstanding speeding ticket that resulted in the issuance of three arrest warrants. The ticket, which was written in 2008, has been the subject of a lengthy legal challenge and much discussion in legal circles. However, the criminal appeals court judge brought all of that to a halt last Thursday -- and before his legal troubles could get any worse.

New high-speed highway opens in Texas amid controversy

As Texas' first 85 mile-per-hour highway makes its debut, not everyone is on board with the new road, which now has the highest regulated speed limit in the United States. According to critics, the 40-mile stretch of road could be a dangerous highway that leads to even faster and more rampant speeding than is already seen on other state highways. Increased highway speed limits have become common practice in Texas, which has increased speed limits to 75 or 80 miles per hour on almost 6,500 miles of highway. This has been done despite warnings from safety experts that an increase in roadway fatalities is likely to occur and despite the fact that Texas already has a high traffic fatality rate compared with other states.In regard to the 85 mile-per-hour speed limit, state officials say they aren't worried about an increase in highway deaths, indicating that data shows previous speed limit increases across the state did not produce catastrophic results.

Speed cameras continuing to plague D.C. drivers

From New York to Los Angeles, drivers in any big city are accustomed to dealing with certain realities while navigating their respective streets. One of these realities is that at some moment they will take their eyes off the speedometer and find themselves being handed a speeding ticket by a police officer.

Police officer believes ticket issued to popular college football coach caused his firing

Clemson University head football coach Dabo Swinney is a popular figure in his state -- so popular, in fact, that a recently fired police officer believes he was terminated for issuing him a speeding ticket. The ticket was issued early last month after the coach was clocked driving 63 miles-per-hour in a 35 mile-per-hour zone in Pickens, South Carolina, a town just 20 miles from Clemson's campus. Swinney -- who was pulled over in the parking lot of a grocery store where he was scheduled to perform his radio show -- ended up signing autographs for fans who saw him waiting outside his truck for the speeding ticket.

Double trouble: Driver gets two speeding tickets at once

It's bad enough to get one speeding ticket. Getting two speeding tickets at the same time is much worse -- and not something that anyone expects to happen. It did happen recently, though, to a retired couple driving on a Georgia road. The driver informed a local news station that she was astonished when a patrol car pulled her over, as she hasn't gotten a speeding ticket in 30 years. However, by the time she pulled over to the side of the road, there were two police cars behind her.

Pulled Over? Arrested? Tell Us What Happened.

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