• Google Plus
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Former Traffic Court Judge Serving New York and New Jersey

Call right now: 212-691-0175

Former Traffic Court Judge

Begin a free consultation

Posts tagged "Traffic Violations"

Philadelphia Traffic Court judges accused of fixing tickets

Federal prosecutors recently filed fraud charges against nine current and former judges of the Philadelphia Traffic Court, alleging that these officials reduced traffic violations for several well-connected drivers. According to sources, the judges are accused of fixing traffic citations for what prosecutors call business, social or political associates. And in return? According to the charges, these judges received such perks as free car repairs or even free shipments of fresh seafood. The 77-count indictment filed against the judges includes conspiracy, mail fraud and wire fraud charges. Prosecutors are alleging that they threw out tickets for such offenses as speeding and/or turned these tickets into lesser offenses. In other cases, the judges are accused of finding drivers not guilty despite the existence of incontrovertible evidence.

New report ranks New York City fourth in the nation for traffic congestion

In vehicle traffic law news, the Texas A&M Transportation Institute recently released its annual report examining traffic congestion levels here in the United States, and ranking the ten cities in which motorists are most likely to find themselves sitting motionless during rush hour.

Governor's proposal calls for dramatic changes concerning speeding tickets

Every day hundreds of drivers across the state of New York are issued traffic citations for exceeding the speed limit. In the vast majority of cases, the people issued these tickets are not bad drivers, rather they simply had a momentary lapse in judgment or just did not realize how fast they were going.

NFL star receives traffic citation for giving false name

Professional football player Rolando McClain has seen a simple vehicle traffic law violation turn into something far more serious after providing law enforcement with a rather interesting signature.

City labor panel rules in favor of NYPD's restrictions on Traffic Enforcement Agents

It's a fairly good bet that you are relatively unfamiliar with the different hierarchical levels among New York's Traffic Enforcement Agents. In general, Level I agents are tasked with issuing summonses, Level II agents are tasked with directing traffic, Level III agents are tasked with towing motor vehicles and Level IV agents (also registered peace officers) are tasked with truck enforcement issues.

Traffic tickets issued to man in coma

While traffic camera systems are designed to be efficient and unbiased, they can sometimes prove to be models of imperfection. To illustrate, consider a recent news story out of Ohio, where moving violations were issued to a man in a coma.
According to sources, 35-year-old James B. allegedly committed traffic violations by driving 49 miles-per-hour in a 35-mile-per-hour zone back in July 2012. However, at the time the violations occurred, he was in an area hospital fighting for his life after suffering a massive heart attack and slipping into a coma. Family rushed in from out-of-town to visit him, fearing that he wouldn't survive. During that time, one of his family members used his car, which led to the speeding tickets.

Less is more: Newer, shorter parking signs to go up in Manhattan

For decades, motorists attempting to find the elusive parking spot in Manhattan have had to contend with the one-two punch of heavy traffic and virtually indecipherable parking signs. City officials, however, are hoping that this confusion over the "when" and "where" of parking in Manhattan will soon disappear entirely.

How did a man who has never been to NYC get a traffic ticket in Brooklyn?

Last month, a Buffalo man was informed that the state Department of Motor Vehicles had suspended his driver's license for nonpayment of a traffic violation issued to him while he was in New York City.

Study shows that in tough economic times, law enforcement turns to traffic tickets

From the cab driver in New York City to the commuter in Omaha to the delivery driver in Seattle, it's the one sight that prompts universal dread among motorists: flashing red lights in their rearview mirror.

Have there been fewer parking tickets in lower Manhattan lately?

When you hear the expression "too good to be true," chances are the last thing to pop into your head is the parking here in New York City -- particularly in lower Manhattan. However, motorists below 34th Street have reported a noticeable drop in the number of parking tickets affixed to their windshields over the course of the last several months.

Pulled Over? Arrested? Tell Us What Happened.

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy