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Former Traffic Court Judge Serving New York and New Jersey

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November 2012 Archives

Highway safety director with history of traffic violations loses job

You might not be shocked to learn that directors of states' Highway Safety Divisions have a traffic violation or two on their records. But how about 34 entries? As surprising as that may seem, that's exactly what the Boston Globe recently discovered on the record of the director of the Massachusetts Highway Safety Division.

Woman sets Windy City record after receiving 687 parking tickets

We all know how frustrating it can be to receive a traffic violation or, even worse, a parking ticket. You might be faced with the prospect of having to fight a costly ticket even though you did absolutely nothing wrong.

Legislators propose free parking for motorcycles in New York City

It's no secret that some of the most despised vehicle traffic laws in New York have to do with where and when people can leave their vehicles. In other words, there is nothing more infuriating for many people than getting a parking ticket.

Report shows that school bus drivers in major U.S. city are speeding, running red lights

Every morning thousands of parents here in New York and across the country drop their children off at the local school bus stop, trusting that the bus driver will transport their precious cargo to school safely. While this is exactly what happens the overwhelming majority of the time, there are unfortunate exceptions.

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia gets two parking tickets

While it's certainly a hassle to get a ticket for parking or a traffic violation, maybe there's some small consolation in knowing that those in positions of power aren't immune to them either. Such was the case recently when Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia received not one, but two tickets in Philadelphia.

Update: Speed cameras continuing to plague D.C. drivers

Last week, our blog discussed how the nation's capital saw a rather large profit this past fiscal year -- $84.9 million to be exact -- thanks to so-called traffic camera enforcement, meaning both red light cameras and speed cameras. However, we also discussed how area motorists were less than thrilled with this trend, calling it nothing more than a backdoor commuter tax designed to generate revenue for the cash-strapped city.

New high-speed highway opens in Texas amid controversy

As Texas' first 85 mile-per-hour highway makes its debut, not everyone is on board with the new road, which now has the highest regulated speed limit in the United States. According to critics, the 40-mile stretch of road could be a dangerous highway that leads to even faster and more rampant speeding than is already seen on other state highways. Increased highway speed limits have become common practice in Texas, which has increased speed limits to 75 or 80 miles per hour on almost 6,500 miles of highway. This has been done despite warnings from safety experts that an increase in roadway fatalities is likely to occur and despite the fact that Texas already has a high traffic fatality rate compared with other states.In regard to the 85 mile-per-hour speed limit, state officials say they aren't worried about an increase in highway deaths, indicating that data shows previous speed limit increases across the state did not produce catastrophic results.

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