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Former Traffic Court Judge Serving New York and New Jersey

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Former Traffic Court Judge

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When is a license revoked?

A driver's license is typically suspended unless there is a cause to revoke it completely. A revocation is different from a suspension, because the revocation is more serious. The revocation results in the complete loss of your license for a period of time.

Several actions can result in the loss of your license through a revocation. These include leaving the scene of an accident in which there was an injury, failing to appear in court for a traffic summons, drag racing, driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs and reckless driving.

In most states, you'll receive points for violating traffic laws. They typically allow a certain number of points before you lose your license. For instance, a person might lose his or her license temporarily if he or she receives six points in a year or eight in two years. Each state is different, but it typically takes at least a year for points to begin to disappear from your record.

Besides traffic- and driving-related offenses, you can lose your license if you fail to pay child support in some states. Being convicted of a non-DUI drug-related offense could also result in a license revocation. Using fake license plates is also a possible reason to lose your license, which is why you should always have authentic license plates on your vehicle.

If you are facing a charge or citation that could lead to your license getting revoked, it's in your best interests to fight for a suspension or to keep your license. Your attorney can help you review your case and the possibilities for a strong defense.

Source: FindLaw, "How Does a Driver's License Get Revoked?," accessed Oct. 25, 2017

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